A to Z Challenge, Mythology

A is for Anubis (Day 1 of the #AtoZ Blogging Challenge)

A2Z-BADGE 2016-smaller_zpslstazvibMy theme for the “A to Z Challenge” is World Mythology, because it fascinates me.

This is the seventh year the Challenge has run, but it’s the first time I’ve been involved. I’m the 1,807th blogger to sign up, and there are three more days to join. (I dare you.)

My alphabetically, organized posts will run concurrently with my usual posts. Hope you enjoy them.


 

A is for Anubis

The ancient-Egyptian god of funerals and death, Anubis is associated with mummification and the afterlife. Depicted as having a man’s body and a jackal’s head his image has haunted mankind’s imagination since the time of the pharaohs.

Anubis took on several roles during the three-thousand-year long Egyptian 220px-Anubis_attending_the_mummy_of_Sennedjemcivilization: first, as an embalmer; second, as a Lord of the Underworld; and finally as the, god who ushered 220px-BD_Hunefer_cropped_1souls into the afterlife, who stood witness to the”‘weighing of the heart,” test.

 

The Hall of Two Truths

The ancient Egyptians had a grizzly view of “Judgement Day.” Acording to their mythology, after death a man found himself in the Hall of Two Truths.

“In the Hall of Two Truths, the deceased’s heart was weighed against the Shu feather of truth and justice taken from the headdress of the goddess Ma’at. If the heart was lighter than the feather, they could pass on, but if it were heavier they would be devoured by the demon Ammut.” (Crystalinks)

Anubis holding an ankh (a magical symbol of eternal life)  led the deceased to a balancing scale. He would weigh the man’s heart.

If the heart was heavier than the feather, it meant it had been weighed down with evil deeds. Ammut, the god often referred to as the soul-eater, would devour the heavy heart, condemning the man to oblivion for eternity.

But if the heart was lighter than the feather, the deceased was presented to Osiris to join the afterlife.

Thoth, the ibis-headed god of wisdom stood by the procedure to record what happened.

In my Stories

Both Anubis and Ammut play roles in my Mata Hari Series. The CIA’s code name for the bad guy is Anubis. And his sorcerer-son runs afoul with Ammut.


References: Wikipedia, Crystalinks                Photos: Wikipedia


shutterstock_104723360 (1)How about you? Are you interested in ancient Egyptian mysticism? Love to hear from you.

 

52 thoughts on “A is for Anubis (Day 1 of the #AtoZ Blogging Challenge)

  1. Hi Jo-Ann! I am doing a similar theme but mine is Legendary mythical creatures. I a different creature for each day. So, we should have much to talk about! Great first post. I learned alot!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Annette,
      So nice to meet you. I’m heading over to your “A” post in a minute.
      I love legendary mythical creatures.
      Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Tracey
      This is so much fun.
      It’s great to meet you. I’m heading over to your “A” post in a couple of minutes.
      Thanks for stopping by and chatting.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi, Jo-Ann!
    I enjoyed Mythology when in school, but admit I haven’t studied much since. This post was so interesting (especially for a “Southern Graves” writer / researcher). Will definitely be following along with you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Elizabeth
      Thank you for stopping by and chatting. I`ll be heading over to your post in a couple of minutes.
      Nice to meet you.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Thanks Deb
      Nice to meet you. Soul eaters haunt me too:) I’ll check out your blog soon.
      Thanks for stopping by.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Hi Patricia,
      Nice to meet you. I’m planning on mining all mythologies. Why not?
      Thanks for stopping by and commenting.
      I’ll visit you in a couple minutes.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Hi Barb,
      Thanks. I hope you like my series. And congrats for getting back into blogging.
      Nice to meet you.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Hi Miss Andi,
      So nice to meet you.
      I’m having a blast with this challenge. I look forward to seeing you again.
      I’ll check out your site in a couple of minutes.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Jo
      Thanks for coming over. I don’t relish the though of running into a jackal headed guy after death either. lol. It’s nice getting to know you.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Hi John,
      Yeah, the code name was a bit of a stretch, but I had the heroine roll her eyes at the ludicrousy of it all. I love making up stories, but it’s hard to match the old myths.
      Thanks for stopping by and chatting.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

  3. Hi Jo-Ann, This is a great theme to come up with. Greek and Egyptian mythology are something that interests me a lot. Great post. Thank you for sharing. Loved it.
    Have a great day. Best wishes 🙂

    Like

  4. Hi Jo-Ann, I love Mytho-Fiction! I have a lot of Egyptian, Roman, Greek,Norse mythologies besides Indian mythology! There are equivalent characters in all Mythologies! Lord Yama would the Indian equivalent of Anubis.
    Love your theme. I’ll be back for sure!
    @KalaRavi16 from
    Relax-N-Rave

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Kala
      Thank you.
      I think that’s what fascinates me most about mythology is how it crosses borders and cultures. I’m definitely going to check out Lord Yama.
      I visited your site and left a note. It’s awesome. I’ll feature it on the bottom of my D day:)
      This is fun.
      Nice to meet you.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Like

    1. Hi,
      I love reading about ancient Egypt. Truly fascinating. And I agree the image of standing with Anubis beside the scale of justice is riveting. Thanks so much for stopping by and commenting. I’ll check out your blog.
      Best Wishes
      Jo-Ann

      Liked by 1 person

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